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Sea Scout Experience Advanced Leadership Training (SEAL)

The Sea Scout Experience Advanced Leadership (SEAL) training program is designed to teach leadership skills while underway. SEAL is designed to “jump start” the junior leaders of new Ships and to fine tune leaders of experienced Ships. It is a hard core, physically and mentally demanding, and remarkably rewarding hands-on leadership experience. New and experienced Sea Scouts can succeed at SEAL so long as they are willing to learn and work hard at preparation.

Download the SEAL Application 2015 here.

 

History and Purpose

In 1996, the National Sea Scouting Committee created a new youth leadership course called Sea Scout Advanced Leadership (SEAL) training. The course is designed to develop leadership skills in young adults. Seamanship is the medium through which the course is taught; however, nautical skills are the means, not the end. This course, which utilizes an “at sea” experience as a laboratory, is intended to teach and apply leadership skills. There are few other media offering the opportunity for young people to actually put leadership skills utilizing group dynamics into practice. In SEAL, there is no “play acting.” All situations and tasks are real, not created. Bad decisions or team failure can produce immediate and real problems.

 

Curriculum

This week long “at sea” experience allows the student to learn and apply new skills immediately. Courses consist of five to seven youth with a Course Skipper and two instructors. Each instructional module relates to a specific leadership skill with exercises designed to show mastery of the concepts taught while under the leadership of the Boatswain of the Day. SEAL is NOT a seamanship course. All applicants are expected to have basic seamanship skills prior to arrival.

Skills Taught

Evaluation Team Building Leadership
Training Communicating Goal Setting
Planning & Preparing Motivating Managing, Supervising & Commanding
Counseling Implementing & Re-Implementing Problem Solving

 

Preparing for SEAL

SEAL candidates must arrive at the course prepared to learn, lead, and excel. It is not a seamanship course and all candidates must become intimately familiar with the Safety & Seamanship chapter and appendix of the current Sea Scout Manual. Candidates will be required to outline the chapter in detail. Additionally, candidates must be able to perform basic coastal navigation on paper and must be able to tie all knots required for Apprentice Sea Scout and Ordinary Sea Scout ranks. They must know and understand the basic nomenclature of a sailing vessel; know and understand helm commands and points of relative bearings. All of this information is in the Sea Scout Manual.

 

Conducting the Training

This course is managed by the National Sea Scout Committee and have been conducted at Chesapeake Bay, the Texas Gulf Coast, the Pacific, the Ohio River Valley, Florida Keys, Long Island Sound, and the Great Lakes. Course dates vary but are always held in the summer months. Costs are typically from $125 to $250 not including candidate transportation to and from the course. Check our event calendar for course offerings.

 

Requirements

    • Achieve Ordinary Rank by June 1st the year of the course.
    • Apply leadership skills with their ship after the course.

Before Students Arrive

The student will:

  • Prepare an outline of “Chapter 4” of the Sea Scout Manual to be forwarded to the course’s Skipper for evaluation.
  • Know basic nomenclature of a sailing vessel.
  • Know and be able to perform basic coastal navigation.
  • Be able to tie all knots required for Apprentice and Ordinary Ranks in less than three minutes.
  • Know standard helm commands.

Two practice tests are sent to the applicant’s Skipper prior to the course that cover seamanship covered in “Chapter 4” of the Sea Scout Manual and basic coastal navigation. The student’s performance on these practice tests helps the student know better how to prepare for the course.

 

Goals

By the end of the course, graduates will be equipped with leadership skills and management tools necessary to fire up a ship’s program. They will be prepared to serve in leadership positions such as Boatswain or Boatswain’s Mate in their ships as well as in their schools, jobs, and communities.

 

Recognitions

Each graduate receives the coveted SEAL pin. SEAL patches are also available to graduates, which can be worn on their uniform instead of the pin. SEAL graduates are also selected to represent Sea Scouts with other opportunities such as trips on submarines, aircraft carriers, and as course marshals for the America’s Cup races.

 

Applications

Applications are due each year by March 1st, and are available for download here. All courses are posted, and the applicant must list their preference in priority order. If two or more Scouts from the same ship are applying, they should apply for different locations. Further questions should be directed to the National SEAL Training Coordinator, Mr. Jim Elroy here or by telephone at (805) 797-7900.

 

Preparing for SEAL

The Skipper’s evaluation of the candidate’s readiness for SEAL is critical. The application consists of an admonition and instructions to the Skipper regarding evaluation of the applicant. Preparation and full readiness regarding the knowledge of seamanship as set out in the Safety & Seamanship Chapter of the Sea Scout Manual and coastal piloting is absolutely essential prior to arrival at the training site. Failure to fully prepare ensures failure of this course and the waste of a valuable space for someone else that would have been able to participate.

 

To assist candidates' preparation, two tests are forwarded to their Skipper. The first tests the candidates knowledge on the Safety & Seamanship Chapter of the current Sea Scout Manual, the second tests their knowledge of basic coastal navigation. In the navigation test, candidates will set a course, compute speed, time and distance, compass error, a fix by two lines of position and finding latitude and longitude. These tests are used by the candidate and her Skipper to determine the candidate's readiness for SEAL. Using the results of the test, the Skipper can tell if the candidate needs help before she reports to SEAL training.

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CaliforniaTeamTakes 2014 William I. Koch International Sea Scout Cup

 

LONG BEACH – For the fifth time in seven regattas, a California team has won the William I. Koch International Sea Scout Cup, narrowly beating the strongest field of sailors in the history of the event. The week long sailing regatta was held at the Long Beach Sea Scout Base and Long Beach Yacht Club from June 21-28th.

The biennial regatta was so close that the winners were decided after the last race in Alamitos Bay. Ben Brough and Laura Roudebush of Ship 90 in Newport Beach, California defeated Alex Schwinn and William Cassara of Ship 809 in Keller, Texas and won the silver trophy by a single point. Third place went to Liz Fletcher and David Cornella of Ship 936 in Dana Point, California.

Brough and Roudebush who are members of the SSS Renegades thanked the Sea Scout program for introducing them to sailing. Brough, 17, of Orange, is going into his senior year in high school. Roudebush, 18, of Newport, will attend UCLA in the fall where she will be a member of the sailing team.

"I am beyond grateful for the opportunities that Sea Scouts and sailing have given me to grow as both an individual and a team member," Roudebush said. "The Koch Cup experience represented the leadership skills Sea Scouts have taught me."

"Sea Scouts has given me a lifelong passion for sailing," Brough said. "The Koch competition - just as awesome as winning the trophy was coming away with so many friendships with scouts from around the world. I would compete again next time knowing that win or lose I'll still come out ahead."

This event is the second Koch Cup regatta for Roudebush and Brough's first. Roudebush competed two years ago when the regatta was hosted by the California Maritime Academy in Vallejo, California.

Named after William I. Koch, the Palm Beach businessman who won the 1992 America's Cup, the weeklong sailing event brings Sea Scouts together from around the world to build camaraderie and friendship. More than 70 young men and women from 10 countries converged upon the Long Beach Sea Scout Base and the Long Beach Yacht Club, sailing two member CFJ's on courses in Long Beach harbor and Alamitos Bay. The event was underwritten by Oxbow Carbon LLC, which has operated a carbon storage facility in Long Beach harbor for the past four decades.

Sea Scouts from Brazil, Ireland, Finland, Poland, Portugal, Trinidad and Tobago, New Zealand, South Africa, United Kingdom and the United States competed in light to moderate winds. Sailors were divided into two flights, the championship flight which comprised the Koch Cup. A consolation flight was established in 2002, allowing sailors to compete for a Maori carved statue known as the Kiwi Cup.

The winners of the Kiwi Cup were Andrew Berkowitz and Isabella Rudow of Ship 441, Queens, New York. Second place went to Shawn Sovie and Nathan Cullinan of Ship 41 in Lakewood, Ohio. Connor Stewart and Dan Schmidtke of Ship 45 in Pearland, Texas placed third.

In the United States, Sea Scouts is a division of the Boy Scouts of America and open to young men and women between the ages of 14 and 21. Scouts form Ships and learn leadership through seamanship. In 2000, the Sea Scouts program asked Bill Koch if he would be interested in reviving a national sailing competition that had been dormant since World War II.

Koch requested that the regatta be open to Scouts from around the world in order to foster international understanding and camaraderie. He commissioned a trophy from Asprey Garrard's, the silversmith who made the original America's Cup trophy, and donated it to the Boy Scouts of America. The Koch Cup now resides in the Norman Rockwell room at the national Boy Scout Museum in Irving, Texas.

Scouts Teddy Carter and Sarah Wyman of Dana Point, California, and Kester Wade and Andrew Agard of Trinidad and Tabago were nominated by their fellow Scouts for the Sportsmanship award. Scouts Gemma McDowell and Sarah McKernan of Malahide, Ireland and Nicholas Harvey and Connor Woodhouse of Johannesburg, South Africa won the Spirit awards.


Press Contact: Brad Goldstein
Oxbow Carbon LLC
(561) 907-5422
(561) 310-4642 (cell)

WINNER'S CIRCLE
KOCH CUP KIWI CUP

1st Place

usa08 brough-ausa08 roudebush-a

BEN BROUGH - Skipper / LAURA ROUDEBUSH – Crew
Ship 90 SSS RENEGADES
Newport Beach, Calif. USA

1st Place

 usa03 berkowitz-ausa03 rudrow-a

ANDREW BERKOWITZ-Skipper / ISABELLA RUDOW-Crew
Ship 441 SSS VIGILANT
Queens, NY USA

 

2nd Place

usa11 schwinn-ausa11 cassara-a

ALEX SCHWINN- Skipper / WILLIAM CASSARA – Crew
Ship 809 SSS SOLARIS
Keller, Texas USA

 

2nd Place

usa13 sovie-ausa13 cullinan-a

SHAWN SOVIE – Skipper / NATHAN CULLINAN – Crew
Ship 41 SSS INDOMITABLE
Lakewood, Ohio USA

 

3rd Place

usa12 cornella-ausa12 fletcher-a

DAVID CORNELLA- Skipper / LIZ FLETCHER - Crew
Ship 936 SSS MARINERS
Dana Point, Calif. USA

 

 3rd Place

usa22 stewart-ausa22 schmidtke-s

CONNER STEWART – Skipper / DAN SCHMIDTKE –Crew
Ship 45 SSS KRAKEN
Pearland, Tx USA

 

SPORTSMANSHIP AWARD

KOCH CUP KIWI CUP
usa10 carter-ausa10 wyman-a 

TEDDY CARTER-Skipper / SARAH WYMAN – Crew
Ship 936 SSS MARINERS
Dana Point, CA USA

tri01 wade-atri01 agard-a

KESTER WADE- Skipper /ANDREW AGARD – Crew
1st Trinidad Sea Scouts
Trinidad & Tabago

 

SPIRIT AWARD

KOCH CUP KIWI CUP
irl01 mcdowell-airl01 mckernan-a

GEMMA MCDOWELL -Skipper / SARAH MCKERNAN – Crew
SSS MALAHIDE
Malahide, Ireland

saf01 harvey-asaf01 woodhouse-a

NICHOLAS HARVEY – Skipper /CONNOR WOODHOUSE – Crew
Johannesburg, So. Africa   
       

Contact: Brad Goldstein
(561) 907-5400 (Ext.5422)
(561) 310-4642 (Mobile)